THEMES THAT YOU LIKE
Maybe I'm the one who is a schizophrenic psycho.

I'm a little bit shy, a bit strange and a little bit manic.

Anonymous asked: I had an awesome time with you yesterday, you're great, funny, pretty and you watch dexter! Sorry again, but thats how I really feel.

Is this who I think it is? :3 Of course, who else could it be :p I’ll text you soon, buttmuncher!

Gotta love this song. Mm mm~

(Source: Spotify)

sciencenote:

First direct evidence of cosmic inflation
Almost 14 billion years ago, the universe we inhabit burst into existence in an extraordinary event that initiated the Big Bang. In the first fleeting fraction of a second, the universe expanded exponentially, stretching far beyond the view of our best telescopes. All this, of course, was just theory.
"Detecting this signal is one of the most important goals in cosmology today. A lot of work by a lot of people has led up to this point," said John Kovac (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), leader of the BICEP2 collaboration.
These groundbreaking results came from observations by the BICEP2 telescope of the cosmic microwave background — a faint glow left over from the Big Bang. Tiny fluctuations in this afterglow provide clues to conditions in the early universe. For example, small differences in temperature across the sky show where parts of the universe were denser, eventually condensing into galaxies and galactic clusters.
Since the cosmic microwave background is a form of light, it exhibits all the properties of light, including polarization. On Earth, sunlight is scattered by the atmosphere and becomes polarized, which is why polarized sunglasses help reduce glare. In space, the cosmic microwave background was scattered by atoms and electrons and became polarized too.
"Our team hunted for a special type of polarization called ‘B-modes,’ which represents a twisting or ‘curl’ pattern in the polarized orientations of the ancient light," said co-leader Jamie Bock (Caltech/JPL).
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